My Lindblad

About My Lindblad

Freelance dancer, choreographer & teacher. I graduated from The Danish National School of Performing Arts in 2003. I am based in Copenhagen, Denmark but over the past 12 years I have worked as a freelance dance artist all over the Nordic countries and in USA. In 2005 I started to make my own work and it has been performed at different venues and festivals, e.g WestFest and Judson Church in New York, Halka Art in Istanbul and Not Festival in Copenhagen. I am a member of the board of Independent Choreographers in Denmark that is a political voice and professional forum for its members. For more info check out: www.mylindblad.dk

My Lindblad

Life begins at the end of your comfortzoneThe current interest in my work, is to find ways of how to come out of your own comfort zone and challenge the perception of yourself.

As a danceartist, one of my ongoing goals and focus points, lies on how to break old physical habits and patterns, in a constant search to renew myself and my way of moving. In my last solo work “Old Traces, New Places” I´ve worked a lot on challenging my own personal limits regarding how and what to do in a performance situation, in order to get myself out of my comfort zone. In this work, which is the most personal work I´ve created up to date, my artistic mission has been to retrace my life and my memories so far, in a search to rediscover myself again and potentially arrive in a new place.

Photo: Suwan Kim

 

In May 2015, I had the pleasure to be a part of the program “Nordic Body” at 92nd Street Y in New York together with three other female Nordic choreographers. Here is a review of my work “Where the Magic Happens” from “The New York Times” May 11.

The next offerings were just as intimate and full of precise dancing, of which the most elegantly embroidered was Ms. Lindblad’s “Where the Magic Happens,” a duet for herself — six months pregnant — and Stuart Shugg, another Trisha Brown dancer. Starting in near darkness, the light grew increasingly radiant as the performers, using their natural momentum in an array of seamless undulations of tilts and dips, mirrored each other and drew apart. It was spine-tingling: understated, yet grippingly full of sensation.

Check out the full review here: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/05/12/arts/dance/review-the-nordic-body-moves-at-92nd-street-y.html

 

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